See the world's first solar-powered fitness tracker

Read more: See the world's first solar-powered fitness trackerThe world's first solar-powered activity tracker also happens to be the blingiest. A collaboration between Misfit Wearables and cut-crystal purveyor Swarovski, the upcoming "Swarovski Shine" serves as a stylish counterpoint to the proliferation of fitness bands on the market, while eliminating the need to charge or replace batteries.

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Learn all about the amazing eco-boat

Read more: Learn all about the amazing eco-boatMargot Krasojevic's design for a solar-powered, perpetual-motion maritime vehicle features hydrofoils and laminated Fresnel lenses that concentrate solar power to run its motorized mast. The Fresnel Hydrofoil Trimaran has a rigid carbon fiber composite sail meant to generate wind energy and ensure higher speeds and smoother rides.

Read more: Learn all about the amazing eco-boat

Controlling light

Read more: Controlling lightA new system could provide the first method for filtering light waves based on direction. MIT researchers have produced a system that allows light of any color to pass through only if it is coming from one specific angle; the technique reflects all light coming from other directions. This new approach could ultimately lead to advances in solar photovoltaics, detectors for telescopes and microscopes, and privacy filters for display screens.

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The Tsunami-Proof Pod

Read more: The Tsunami-Proof PodAfter watching the day-to-day coverage of the Fukushima disaster and a flood-devastated Japan, Chris Robinson, a former art director for Facebook and Paypal, started the construction of a defense in the event that a tsunami were to ever strike his home − a "tsunami pod".

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The ability of Atlantic razor clam - replicated in the lab

Read more: The ability of Atlantic razor clam - replicated in the labA small robot replicates a clam's ability to burrow into soil while using very little energy. The Atlantic razor clam (Ensis directus) is an animal that uses very little energy to burrow into undersea soil at high speed. A detailed insight into how the animal digs has led to the development of a robotic clam that can perform the same trick.

Read more: The ability of Atlantic razor clam - replicated in the lab